Sunday, November 18, 2018

Adaptive Gardening and much more in the November 2018 issue of Washington Gardener Magazine





The November 2018 issue of Washington Gardener Magazine is out.

You can also view it online at:

 Inside this issue:
·         Adaptive Gardening: Gardening for a Lifetime
·         All About Amaryllis
·         Pickled Paperwhites
·         Tips for Growing Chrysanthemum
·         Turnip Tales
·         Botanical Artist Marcella Kriebel
·         When Is It Too Late to Plant?
·         Spotted Lanternfly Facts
·         3 New English Roses
·         Native Honeysuckle: A Fine Vine
·         How Porous Pavement Helps Capture and Clean Water
·         And much more….

Note that any submissions, event listings, and advertisements for the December 2018 issue are due by December 1.

  Subscribe to Washington Gardener Magazine today to have the monthly publication sent to your inbox as a PDF several days before it is available online. You can use the PayPal (credit card) online order form here: http://www.washingtongardener.com/index_files/subscribe.htm

Friday, November 09, 2018

Fenton Friday: Freeze Coming = Final Post of the Season

With a real freeze (not frost) predicted for this weekend, this will be my last Fenton Friday post of the growing season. At the point, there is not much left in the garden to do. I brought in some helpers from the Silver Spring Time Bank (pictured at left) last Sunday and we cleared out most of the plot. We then spread a thick layer of straw over everything.

What is left wintering over in the plot:

The Asparagus and Strawberry beds are mulched and dormant.

The Garlic shoots are already up. I was given more garlic varieties to trial this week and will get those in asap as well.

The Beets and Swiss Chard are looking good and we should be able to harvest them in a few weeks.

I also have two Thornless Blackberry bushes and a Blueberry bush still in pots, that I think I'd like to move to he plot as my home garden is too shady for them. We'll see if I get time to do that before the ground freezes.

What is growing in your edible garden this week?

About Fenton Friday: Every Friday during the growing season, I'll be giving you an update on my community garden plot at the Fenton Street Community Garden just across the street from my house. I'm plot #16. It is a 10 ft x 20 ft space and this is our 7th year in the garden. (It opened in May 2011.) See past posts about our edible garden by putting "Fenton" into the Search box above.

Friday, November 02, 2018

Fenton Friday: Surprise Carrots

While we were cleaning out one of the garden plot beds this week, I gave a tug on some leafy foliage and ended up with a big handful of carrots! These were the ones I planted early last spring and had totally given up on. The row was kept shaded and hidden when the cosmos, zinnias, and celosia came up and the mild, wet summer helped also. I dug the rest of the row and cleaned them off. They are sweet and not woody or tough in the least. This just proves what I keep telling folks at my cool-season edibles talk--carrots take for-ev-er to germinate and grow.

I think I'll seed in a new row of them this weekend and see if by next spring they are ready.

What is growing in your edible garden this week?

About Fenton Friday: Every Friday during the growing season, I'll be giving you an update on my community garden plot at the Fenton Street Community Garden just across the street from my house. I'm plot #16. It is a 10 ft x 20 ft space and this is our 7th year in the garden. (It opened in May 2011.) See past posts about our edible garden by putting "Fenton" into the Search box above.

Thursday, November 01, 2018

DIY: Stepping Stones

Pavers and stepping stones in your garden are essential for navigating your way around precious plant materials. The decorative aspects are unlimited. Make a path of them, create some as personalized gifts, or use them to mark the burial spot of a beloved pet.

We did these ones (pictured) from a kit, but you can easily gather the supplies and do one from scratch.

This is an easy craft for kids, though it does require close adult supervision as the mixing needs to be precise and the glass mosaic pieces can be sharp.

Caution: Cover your mouth and eyes with protective gear when mixing concrete as the dust can be hazardous if breathed in.





Materials:
- Bucket to mix in
- Water and measuring cup
- Stir sticks or skewers
- Acrylic Paint (optional)


Instructions:

Step 1- Spread out newspaper and lay out a pattern for your mosaic. You may wish the use the cutters to cut the pieces to the exact shape you desire, but I think it is more fun just to work with what you have as a puzzle.

Step 2 - Coat the sides and bottom of the mold with cooking spray so the stone will easily release afterwards.

Step 3 - Add water to your concrete mix according to package instructions and stir. Once it reaches a pancake-batter consistency, pour it into the mold. Use a stir stick to level it and lightly tap the mold on the table it to get out any air bubbles.

Step 4 - Transfer your mosaic art on to the paver surface. Leave at least an 1/8-inch space between the glass pieces. This is where you made need to adjust things as I always find your pattern "expands" when transferred. Next, decorate with the glass gem pieces as desired.

Step 5: Set aside to cure for a day and then un-mold it. Then let it set for another couple of days to totally dry before setting it outside.

Optional: After it has set for about 30 minutes, you can use one of the stir sticks to scratch in some words or a design into the concrete. After the stepping stones are totally dry, you can paint them or leave them plain. 

TIP: Decorate with found objects from marbles to small toys. Press in a leaf or plant stems to make neat-looking impressions.


This is a monthly blog series on DIY projects for the beginning home gardener. Look for the other installments in this DIY blog series by putting "DIY" in the search box here at washingtongardener.blogspot.com

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