Tuesday, May 28, 2024

Win a copy of Growing Herbs for Health, Wellness, Cooking, and Crafts by Kim Roman in the May 2024 Washington Gardener Magazine Reader Contest

 

Win a copy of Growing Herbs for Health, Wellness, Cooking, and Crafts: Includes 51 Culinary Herbs & Spices, 25 Recipes, and 18 Crafts by Kim Roman in the May 2024 Washington Gardener Magazine Reader Contest! (The prize retail value is $19.99.)

   Learn everything you need to know to start your own culinary herb garden in this comprehensive guide about how to get started growing herbs and spices, whether indoors or outdoors. The book includes 51 useful herb plant profiles, including echinacea, St. John’s Wort, turmeric, elderberry, ginger, chamomile, Tulsi (holy basil), anise, hyssop, and many more. The author also shares a few of her favorite recipes where herbs are the star ingredient, including marinades, salad vinaigrettes, infused oils, delicious cocktails or mocktails, herbed and plain focaccia bread, teas, and more.

  To enter to win the gift card, send an email to WashingtonGardenerMagazine@

gmail.com by 5:00pm on Friday, May 31, with “Growing Herbs” in the subject line and in the body of the email. Tell us what your favorite article was in the May 2024 issue of Washington Gardener Magazine issue and why. Include your full name and address. The winner will be announced on June 1. 

Monday, May 27, 2024

Monday Thoughts: “There is simply the rose; it is perfect every moment of its existence.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

 “There is simply the rose; it is perfect every moment of its existence.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

For other Garden Quotes by Emerson, click here.

Saturday, May 25, 2024

GardenDC Podcast Episode 196: Small Town Arboretum

In this episode of GardenDC: The Podcast about Mid-Atlantic Gardening, we talk with returning guest Phil Normandy about a small town arboretum. The plant profile is on Creeping Raspberry and we share what's going on in the garden as well as some upcoming local gardening events and this week's garden tasks in the What's New segment. We close out with the Last Word on Stumpy's Farewell from Christy Page of Green Prints.

If you liked this episode, you may also enjoy listening to:

~ GardenDC Podcast Episode 75: Versatile Virburnums

https://washingtongardener.blogspot.com/2021/09/gardendc-podcast-episode-75-versatile.html

~ GardenDC Podcast Episode 190: Dogwoods

https://washingtongardener.blogspot.com/2024/04/gardendc-podcast-episode-190-dogwoods.html

~ GardenDC Podcast Episode 6: Spring-Flowering Trees and Shrubs

https://washingtongardener.blogspot.com/2020/04/gardendc-podcast-episode-6-spring.html

This episode is archived at: 

https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/gardendc/episodes/Small-Town-Arboretum-e2k3mku

BTW, YOU can become a listener supporter for as little as $0.99 per month! 

See how at: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/gardendc/support.

SHOW NOTES will be posted on May 28.

Please vote for GardenDC in the first-ever GardenComm’s People’s Choice Horti Awards.Voting happens now through 6/15. Go HERE: 

We welcome your questions and comments! You can leave a voice mail message for us at: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/gardendc/message Note that we may use these messages on a future episode.

And be sure to leave us a 5-star review on your favorite podcast platform plus share us on social media with #GardenDC, so other gardeners can find us too!

Episode Credits: Host and Producer: Kathy Jentz

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Friday, May 24, 2024

Fenton Friday: A Bus Came Through

Fenton pollinator garden pre-bus crash. Photo by Cassie Peo.

Fenton pollinator garden post-bus crash and fence repairs.

I woke up Monday to the sound of sirens and the sight of a school bus lodged on the corner fence of the Fenton Street Community Garden like a beached whale. It was reported that no children were on board and that no one was hurt during this crash. However, three of our garden plots suffered damage and the heavy-duty deer fence itself was a tangled mess.
   You can see pics of the bus crash and the immediate aftermath here:
https://www.instagram.com/p/C7Mj-1gOcYe/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link&igsh=MzRlODBiNWFlZA==
    
The pollinator garden we had planted on the outside corner of the fence took the brunt of the crash and suffered even more damage from the works putting in the temporary fence replacement along with the final repairs that took place yesterday. I went over this morning and saw that nothing was salvageable from the plantings -- those included the sunny and colorful Calendula you see at top in the "before" pic along with several Borage plants and a dozen or so Common Milkweeds plus many Marigold and Zinnia seedlings that were just emerging.

I hope to be over there in the next few days to clear the debris out -- a lot of sharp metal pieces and other junk are strewn about. Then, I have some herb seedlings left from the Silver Spring Garden Club's GardenMart sale that I can plant along with some packs of marigolds and zinnias.  I'll share an updated "after" shot next week.

In my own plot, the Radishes, Cilantro, and Spinach are already bolting - as is my Broccoli, which is under a covercloth! It hasn't been that hot out, but apparently, the plants think otherwise. 

I have a bit of weeding to do and the new interns start next week, so we'll plant the warm-season seedlings together then including tomatoes, peppers, and maybe an eggplant.

I also am behind on my cutting garden due to this bus crash and the fact that the row of purple Zinnias I planted two weeks ago was chewed on by, well, I'm not sure. Maybe rabbits. Could be slugs. I'll re-sow those seeds and out Sluggo pellets out and a covercloth over them this time.

What are you growing in your edible garden this week?

About Fenton Friday: Every Friday during the growing season, I'll be giving you an update on my community garden plot at the Fenton Street Community Garden just across the street from my house in zone 7 Mid-Atlantic MD/DC border. I'm plot #16. It is a 10 ft x 20 ft space and this is our 13th year in the garden. (It opened in May 2011.) See past posts about our edible garden by putting "Fenton" into the Search box above (at the top, left on this blog).

Thursday, May 23, 2024

May 2024 issue of Washington Gardener Magazine –Native Azaleas, Green Heron, Summer Squash, and much more…


The May 2024 issue of Washington Gardener Magazine is out. 

Inside this issue:

·         Native Azaleas

·         Battling the Red-Headed Flea Beetle

·         Meet NWF’s Rosalie Bull

·         Growing Summer Squash

·         Lithops: Rock Your World

·         Great Gardening Books Reviewed

·         A Visit to the Sandy Spring Museum

·         Gold Medal Plants

·         Summer Bulbs Bring Joy

·         Green Herons

·         A New Geum

·         and much more…

Note that any submissions, event listings, and advertisements for the June 2024 issue are due by June 5.

>>  Subscribe to Washington Gardener Magazine today to have the monthly publication sent to your inbox as a PDF several days before it is available online. You can use the PayPal (credit card) online order form here: https://www.washingtongardener.com/index_files/subscribe.htm



Wednesday, May 22, 2024

Native Azaleas Plant Profile

 

Native Azaleas Plant Profile

Native Azaleas (Rhododendron spp.) are flowering shrubs that are found in the woodlands on the East Coast of the USA. They do best in light, dappled sunlight.

One of the most striking characteristics of native azaleas is their strong, sweet fragrance, which is often compared to that of honeysuckles. The flowers also resemble clusters of honeysuckle blossoms. Hence, the common name for native azaleas of Wild Honeysuckle.

Native azaleas are deciduous—dropping their leaves in the fall. While the Japanese and Korean azaleas are mainly evergreen as are most of their hybrids. Native azaleas prefer moist, well-drained, acidic soil that is high in organic matter.

The Piedmont azalea (Rhododendron canescens) or the Southern pinxter azalea is native from the Carolinas south to Florida and west to east Texas. The flowers are shades of white, pink, and red. It can grow to 10 feet wide and high and has an airy, open growing habit. It is hardy to USDA zones 5-9.

The Pinxterbloom azalea (Rhododendron periclymenoides) is similar to the Piedmont azalea, but thrives in a more northern native range from Massachusetts to north Georgia and over to Tennessee. It is hardy to USDA zones 4-8 and grows to 5 feet tall and wide.

The Florida flame azalea (Rhododendron austrinum) is native to northern Florida and other far southern states. It grows to 8 to 10 feet tall and has yellow, orange, red, or pink blooms. It's hardy to USDA Zones 6 to 9.

The Alabama azalea (Rhododendron alabamense) is native to Alabama and Georgia. It grows 5 to 6 feet tall. It has blossoms that are white with yellow blotches. It is hardy to USDA Zones 7 to 9.

The Sweet azalea (Rhododendron arborescens)  can grow to 10-20 feet tall. It is native to the Appalachians from Pennsylvania to Alabama, It has white blossoms with red stamens. It is hardy to USDA Zones 4 to 7.

Native birds (especially hummingbirds), bees, butterflies, and other wildlife are attracted to these shrubs and their amazing flowers.

Native Azaleas: You Can Grow That!

The video was produced by Washington Gardener Magazine.

Audio, Photos, and Text by Kathy Jentz

Video and Editing by Cassie Peo

 If you enjoy this video, please give it a thumbs up and subscribe to our Youtube channel (thank you!)

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~ Podcast: GardenDC

If you liked this video, we think you will like these other Plant Profiles:

~ Azaleas: https://washingtongardener.blogspot.com/2018/05/plant-profile-azaleas.html

~ Aronia: https://washingtongardener.blogspot.com/2024/05/aronia-chokeberry-plant-profile.html

~ Carolina Allspice: https://washingtongardener.blogspot.com/2022/05/carolina-allspice-plant-profile.html

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Monday, May 20, 2024

Monday Thoughts: "I think we should fight back against this caustic language. Instead of calling lush landscapes ‘overgrown,’ how about we call barren lawns ‘undergrown’?” ~ Nancy Lawson, Humane Gardener

"I think we should fight back against this caustic language. Instead of calling lush landscapes  ‘overgrown,’ how about we call barren lawns ‘undergrown’?” 

~ Nancy Lawson, Humane Gardener

Saturday, May 18, 2024

GardenDC Podcast Episode 195: Reduce Your Lawn

In this episode of GardenDC: The Podcast about Mid-Atlantic Gardening, we talk with Mike Lizotte of  American Meadows about Reduce Your Lawn Day and planting mini meadows. The plant profile is on Hosta and we share what's going on in the garden as well as some upcoming local gardening events and this week's garden tasks in the What's New segment. We close out with the Last Word on Cultivating Comfort from Christy Page of Green Prints.

If you liked this episode, you may also enjoy listening to:

~ GardenDC Podcast Episode 130: Groundcovers versus Groundcovers

https://washingtongardener.blogspot.com/2022/11/gardendc-podcast-episode-130.html

~ GardenDC Podcast Episode 134: Carex

https://washingtongardener.blogspot.com/2023/01/gardendc-podcast-episode-134-carex-for.html

~ GardenDC Podcast Episode 101: Sustainable Lawn Care

https://washingtongardener.blogspot.com/2022/04/gardendc-podcast-episode-101.html

This episode is archived at: 

https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/gardendc/episodes/Reduce-Your-Lawn-e2jq4v5

BTW, YOU can become a listener supporter for as little as $0.99 per month! 

See how at: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/gardendc/support.

SHOW NOTES: 00:57 Welcome Mike Lizotte of American Meadows 01:19 Lizotte’s gardening backstory 02:33 How Lizotte learned about meadows from seed packing 03:47 How Lizotte got in the business of giving advice about meadows 05:40 The start of Lizotte’s involvement with the business side of American Meadows 07:17 Buying from American Meadows overseas? 08:12 Vermont, Lizotte’s home base 09:33 Vermont’s soil and rocks 10:49 Gardening with short seasons 12:09 Lizotte’s home garden 13:37 Lizotte’s book, Mini Meadows 15:11 GardenComm connrection, Rob Cardillo, and garden photography 17:01 “I'll never forget when Carlene, who was my publisher at Storey, kind of sent me this first, like draft or first glimpse, which included Rob's photography,” said Lizotte. “I think I almost started crying.” 18:09 What is Reduce Your Lawn Day? 20:33 “The consumer right now has never been more in tune with the environment and wanting to do something good,” says Lizotte. 22:50 How you can participate through the website: ReduceYourLawnDay.com hosted by American Meadows 24:50 How to go about reducing: start small 26:11 “When people do start small and they expand, they tend to have a little more of a successful journey,” says Lizotte. 27:26 How do you remove turf? 29:08 According to Lizotte, planning and preparing “really comes down to what might work best for you in the size of the area that you have.” 30:20 Pollinator lawns 32:09 Choosing seed mixes 34:36 Mixed planting versus monoculture 36:22 Choosing a mix of plants to have blooms all year long 38:23 Shade mixes and shade options 40:13 Wildflower mixes and pre-planned gardens 42:38 Deer-resistant plants and mixes 43:56 Deer problems due to lack of nutrients available to deer 45:21 Plants for water situations: too much, or too little 47:15 Maintenance: the key is to know ahead of time what your plants need 49:20 Cutting back your meadow annually 50:26 Burning versus cut-back 52:03 Find American Meadows at americanmeadows.com and Mike Lizotte on Facebook and Instagram 53:15 Mini meadows versus the HOA 54:31 Plant Profile: Hosta 56:51 What’s new in the garden? Dogwoods, Japanese snowbells, and strawberries 57:58 On May 25th, Saturday, there are guided forest bathing walks at 9:30 AM at Hillwood Estate Museum and Gardens, pay the fee and register at hillwoodmuseum.org on that same day. The Baltimore Herb Festival is at Lincoln Park from 9:30 AM to 3:00 PM, register at baltimoreherbfestival.com. Tuesday, May 28th, The Trees of Ladew Walk is happening at 9:30 AM at Ladew Gardens in Monkton, register at ladewgardens.com 59:40 Groundcover Revolution by Kathy Jentz 1:01:09 The Urban Garden by Kathy Jentz and Teri Speight 1:02:04 The Last Word on cultivating comfort in your garden with Christy Page and Amanda MacArthur. 1:04:18 Pumpkins as comfort food 1:06:11 “Cultivating a garden full of comfort vegetables isn't just about the harvest”, says MacArthur, “it's about saving the savoring, the journey, connecting with nature and nourishing both body and soul.”

We welcome your questions and comments! You can leave a voice mail message for us at: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/gardendc/message Note that we may use these messages on a future episode.

And be sure to leave us a 5-star review on your favorite podcast platform plus share us on social media with #GardenDC, so other gardeners can find us too!

Episode Credits: Host and Producer: Kathy Jentz Show Notes: Alexandra Jentz


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