Saturday, April 13, 2024

GardenDC Podcast Episode 190: Dogwoods


In this episode of GardenDC: The Podcast about Mid-Atlantic Gardening, we talk all about dogwoods with George Waters, a horticulturist with the U.S. National Arboretum. The plant profile is on Loropetalum and we share what's going on in the garden as well as some upcoming local gardening events and this week's garden tasks in the What's New segment. We close out with the Last Word on Stalking My Local Nursery by Christy Page of Green Prints.

If you liked this episode, you may also enjoy listening to:

~ GardenDC Podcast Episode 144: Flowering Cherry Trees 

https://washingtongardener.blogspot.com/2023/04/gardendc-podcast-episode-144-flowering.html

~ GardenDC Podcast Episode 119: Crapemyrtles

https://washingtongardener.blogspot.com/2022/09/gardendc-podcast-episode-119.html

~ GardenDC Podcast Episode 6: Spring-Flowering Trees and Shrubs

https://washingtongardener.blogspot.com/2020/04/gardendc-podcast-episode-6-spring.html

~ GardenDC Podcast Episode 106: Ancient Plants

https://washingtongardener.blogspot.com/2022/05/gardendc-podcast-episode-106-ancient.html

This episode is archived at: 

https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/gardendc/episodes/Dogwoods-e2i7jeq

BTW, YOU can become a listener supporter for as little as $0.99 per month! 

See how at: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/gardendc/support.

SHOW NOTES will be posted after 4-16-2024.

We welcome your questions and comments! You can leave a voice mail message for us at: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/gardendc/message Note that we may use these messages on a future episode.

And be sure to leave us a 5-star review on your favorite podcast platform plus share us on social media with #GardenDC, so other gardeners can find us too!

Episode Credits:

Host and Producer: Kathy Jentz

Interview Edit and Show Notes: Hannah Zozobrado

PIN THIS FOR LATER!


Friday, April 12, 2024

Fenton Friday: Runaway Asparagus

As you can see in the above photo, I was away last week so the Asparagus spears have gotten a bit tall. I went ahead and cut them in hopes that the tops are tender enough to still eat for dinner tonight.

We had more rain this week and fierce winds. I took down the old, faded items from our bulletin board and next week I will laminate replacements as well as a new sign at our pollinator garden strip. The pathways are freshly chipped and the community garden is looking great overall!

We planted the white onion sets and weeded a bit. The radish, arugula, and spinach seeds have emerged -- and I finally saw a few peas emerging too. 

I still need to clear a space for planting the potatoes. I think I may do them in a grow bag, because everywhere I think to put the potatoes is a spot I have something else coming up (dahlias) or planned to go in (tomatoes, peppers, and okra).

What are you growing in your edible garden this week?

About Fenton Friday: Every Friday during the growing season, I'll be giving you an update on my community garden plot at the Fenton Street Community Garden just across the street from my house in zone 7 Mid-Atlantic MD/DC border. I'm plot #16. It is a 10 ft x 20 ft space and this is our 13th year in the garden. (It opened in May 2011.) See past posts about our edible garden by putting "Fenton" into the Search box above (at the top, left on this blog).

Wednesday, April 10, 2024

Flowering Almond Plant Profile

Flowering Almond Plant Profile

Dwarf Flowering Almond (Prunus glandulosa) is a multi-stemmed shrub with beautiful light pink or white flowers in early spring. It can reach 3 to 5 feet wide and high.

It prefers full to part-sun and is tolerant of a range of soil types. It also does well in urban conditions. However, it cannot stand to sit in wet soil for long periods. Once established, it is quite drought-tolerant. It is a rose relative and is native to Asia. Despite the common name of “Flowering Almond,” it does not produce almonds (that is a different tree entirely). Butterflies and other pollinators are attracted to the flowers. It is the larval host plant for the Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Flowering Almond is hardy to zones 4-8. It requires frequent pruning, do so right after it flowers. Take out any old wood and anything dead, diseased, or damaged. It is easy to propagate from softwood cuttings in late spring or early summer. It can be a short-lived plant in the garden due to its susceptibility to diseases and insect issues, but it is worth growing for its decorative value and as a cut flower. This was a favorite shrub of Thomas Jefferson, who planted it extensively at Monticello. Flowering Almond: You Can Grow That! The video was produced by Washington Gardener Magazine as part of our Plant Profile series for Mid-Atlantic USA gardeners. Audio and text by Kathy Jentz Video and editing by Cassie Peo ➤ If you enjoy this video, please give it a thumbs up and subscribe to our YouTube channel (thank you!) ➤Remember to TURN ON notifications to know when our new videos are out ➤ FIND Washington Gardener Magazine ONLINE ~ WashingtonGardener.blogspot.com ~ http://twitter.com/WDCGardener ~ https://www.instagram.com/wdcgardener/ ~ Facebook.com/WashingtonGardenerMagazine ~ Podcast: GardenDC If you liked this video, we think you will like these our Plant Profiles: ~ Flowering Quince https://youtu.be/pl8rAgzJ40E?si=3lF83le8N9XpcjjX ~ Spirea https://youtu.be/Dp1vbWuiuG8?si=c3t-nmgTG0H5XDOX ~ Weigela https://youtu.be/tUsZZj3iTHU?si=FfB5ld0g-LhlaYwL ~ Daphne https://youtu.be/rOXRQ_xWywE?si=EhvSQE7J1MDYpQij

Monday, April 08, 2024

Monday Thoughts: “The single greatest lesson the garden teaches is that our relationship to the planet need not be zero-sum... as long as the sun still shines and people still can plan and plant, think and do, we can, if we bother to try, find ways to provide for ourselves without diminishing the world.” - Michel Pollan

"The single greatest lesson the garden teaches is that our relationship to the planet need not be zero-sum... as long as the sun still shines and people still can plan and plant, think and do, we can, if we bother to try, find ways to provide for ourselves without diminishing the world.” - Michael Pollan

Saturday, April 06, 2024

GardenDC Podcast Episode 189: Organic Gardening


In this episode of GardenDC: The Podcast about Mid-Atlantic Gardening, we talk with food system instructor and author* Tanya Denckla Cobb about organic gardening techniques. The plant profile is on Japanese Andromeda and we share what's going on in the garden as well as some upcoming local gardening events and this week's garden tasks in the What's New segment. We close out with the Last Word on the Wildflower Garden.

If you liked this episode, you may also enjoy listening to:

~ GardenDC Podcast Episode 101: Sustainable Lawn Care 

https://washingtongardener.blogspot.com/2022/04/gardendc-podcast-episode-101.html

~ GardenDC Podcast Episode 71: Soil Health

https://washingtongardener.blogspot.com/2021/08/gardendc-podcast-episode-71-soil-health.html

~ GardenDC Podcast Episode 147: Sustainable Gardening Practices

https://washingtongardener.blogspot.com/2023/04/gardendc-podcast-episode-147.html

~ GardenDC Podcast Episode 117: Environmentally Friendly Gardening

https://washingtongardener.blogspot.com/2022/08/gardendc-podcast-episode-117.html

 


This episode is archived at: 

 https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/gardendc/episodes/Organic-Gardening-e2hp2ik

BTW, YOU can become a listener supporter for as little as $0.99 per month! 

See how at: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/gardendc/support.

SHOW NOTES will be posted after 4-10-2024.

We welcome your questions and comments! You can leave a voice mail message for us at: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/gardendc/message Note that we may use these messages on a future episode.

And be sure to leave us a 5-star review on your favorite podcast platform plus share us on social media with #GardenDC, so other gardeners can find us too!

Episode Credits:

Host and Producer: Kathy Jentz

Interview Edit and Show Notes: Hannah Zozobrado

PIN THIS FOR LATER!

*The Backyard Homestead Guide to Growing Organic Food is available on Amazon at: https://amzn.to/49kQQVk (Note: This is an affiliate link and we may earn some pennies when you click on it.)

Friday, April 05, 2024

Fenton Friday: Parsley Planted

This will be a quick note this week as I was away for most of it at the Azalea Society of America annual meeting. I did manage to get the parsley seedling planted that I has bought at the Valley View Farms garden center. 

I also grabbed a few more asparagus spears to eat and weeded a little in the plot and around the front-corner pollinator garden.

Fellow plot gardeners tell me we had several days of rain while I was away and fairly seasonal (cool) temps, so that is good to know. I didn't even bother arranging to have someone else come and water as I knew we had rains in the forecast before I headed out of town.

Next on the list for planting are the seed potatoes and onion sets. 

What are you growing in your edible garden this week?

About Fenton Friday: Every Friday during the growing season, I'll be giving you an update on my community garden plot at the Fenton Street Community Garden just across the street from my house in zone 7 Mid-Atlantic MD/DC border. I'm plot #16. It is a 10 ft x 20 ft space and this is our 13th year in the garden. (It opened in May 2011.) See past posts about our edible garden by putting "Fenton" into the Search box above (at the top, left on this blog).

Wednesday, April 03, 2024

Ipheion Plant Profile

 

Ipheion Plant Profile

Ipheion (Ipheion uniflorum) is a flowering bulb that blooms in early spring. The flowers are typically pale blue, white, or pink. It is also known as Starflower, Mexican Star, Springstar, and Starlikes.

It is a South American native -- where it is used as a groundcover plant.  Ipheion grows to about 10 inches high. The Latin name and classification have changed several times for Ipheion.

Pollinators are crazy for it. The flowers are sweetly-scented, but the grass-like foliage smells like garlic when crushed -- which makes it deer- and rabbit-resistant.

It is hardy to USDA Zones 5 to 9. Ipheion prefers full- to part-sun and slightly moist soils. It is fairly drought-tolerant so does well in rock gardens and in containers.

You can purchase the bulbs and plant them in the fall. It looks great in combination with daffodils and tulips. This is also an old-fashioned pass-along plant. Bulbs can be dug and divided shortly after the flowers fade.

It will self-seed and naturalize in lawn areas, then dies back by mid-spring. Ipheion is also a good cut-flower and is easy to use for bulb forcing too.

Ipheion: You Can Grow That!

The video was produced by Washington Gardener Magazine as part of our Plant Profile series for Mid-Atlantic USA gardeners.

Audio and text by Kathy Jentz

Video and editing by Cassie Peo

If you enjoy this video, please give it a thumbs up and subscribe to our Youtube channel (thank you!)

Remember to TURN ON notifications to know when our new videos are out

FIND Washington Gardener Magazine ONLINE

~ WashingtonGardener.blogspot.com

~ http://twitter.com/WDCGardener

~ https://www.instagram.com/wdcgardener/

~ Facebook.com/WashingtonGardenerMagazine

~ Podcast: GardenDC

 PIN THIS FOR LATER!

Saturday, March 30, 2024

GardenDC Podcast Episode 188: Making More Plants

In this episode of GardenDC: The Podcast about Mid-Atlantic Gardening, we talk with renowned lecturer and garden book author Ken Druse about making more plants*. The plant profile is on Ipheion and we share what's going on in the garden as well as some upcoming local gardening events and this week's garden tasks in the What's New segment. We close out with the Last Word on Sharing is Caring by Christy Page of Green Prints.

If you liked this episode, you may also enjoy listening to:

~ GardenDC Podcast Episode 58: Grafting Fruit Trees 

https://washingtongardener.blogspot.com/2021/05/gardendc-podcast-episode-58-grafting.html

~ GardenDC Podcast Episode 45: Seed Starting Tips

https://washingtongardener.blogspot.com/2021/02/gardendc-podcast-episode-45-seed.html

~ GardenDC Podcast Episode 165: Gardening and the Weather with Margaret Roach

https://washingtongardener.blogspot.com/2023/09/gardendc-podcast-episode-165-gardening.html

 

This episode is archived at: 

https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/gardendc/episodes/Making-More-Plants-e2hjjbi

 

BTW, YOU can become a listener supporter for as little as $0.99 per month! 

See how at: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/gardendc/support.

SHOW NOTES will be posted around 4-10-2024.

Ken's book, Making More Plants, is available at https://amzn.to/3xiuGpH (note this is an affiliate link and we may earn a few pennies when you click on it.)

We welcome your questions and comments! You can leave a voice mail message for us at: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/gardendc/message Note that we may use these messages on a future episode.

And be sure to leave us a 5-star review on your favorite podcast platform plus share us on social media with #GardenDC, so other gardeners can find us too!

Episode Credits:
Host and Producer: Kathy Jentz
Interview Edit and Show Notes: Hannah Zozobrado

PIN THIS FOR LATER!

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