Sunday, October 25, 2020

Win 2021 Garden Calendars from Workman Publishing in our October 2020 Washington Gardener Magazine Reader Contest

For our October 2020 Washington Gardener Magazine Reader Contest, Washington Gardener is giving away 2021 garden calendars from Workman Publishing (value $15, workman.com). 

   Workman 2021 calendars are the perfect gift for the growing number of green thumbs since the pandemic hit. Workman introduces a whole new lineup of lively, garden-inspired calendars—along with new editions of old favorites. 

   The Secret Garden wall calendar, with over 1 million copies sold, explores all the best-kept secrets gardens have to offer. The Birds in the Garden from Audubon features a gorgeous photo each month that is like glancing out the window and spotting a jewel-like songbird alighting on a flower.

   To enter to win a garden calendar, send an email to:

WashingtonGardenerMagazine@gmail.com by 5:00pm on Saturday, October 31, with “Workman Calendar” in the subject line and in the body of the email, tell us what your favorite article was in the October 2020 issue and why. Include your full name and mailing address. The winner will be announced on November 1.  




Saturday, October 24, 2020

GardenDC Podcast Episode 34: Colorful Foliage and Longwood's Chrysanthemum Festival

This episode we talk with Karl Gercens of Longwood Gardens about fabulous fall color from foliage as well as Longwood's legendary Chrysanthemum Festival. The plant profile is on Wild Ageratum and I share a bit about the Pink Muhly Grass in my garden.


BTW, YOU can become a listener supporter for as little as $0.99 per month!
See how at: https://anchor.fm/kathy-jentz/support. 

The episode is posted at: https://anchor.fm/gardendc/episodes/October-24--2020---Colorful-Foliage-and-Longwoods-Chrysanthemum-Festival-elg4r6

It is also available on -
  • Google Podcasts at this link, either now or soon (note that currently, this link will only work on Android devices)


We welcome your questions and comments! 
You can leave a voice mail message for us at: https://anchor.fm/kathy-jentz/message Note that we may use these messages on a future episode.


PIN THIS FOR LATER!

Friday, October 23, 2020

Fenton Friday: The Lettuce is Ready for Its Close-up

 

The interns stopped by the plot this week and were each able to go home with a small bag of the Lettuce Leaf 'Salad Bowl Blend' along with a handful of Cherry Tomatoes, a few Okra pods, and some Peppers 'Roulette'. I am going to pause to here to say, have you ever seen a more pretty lettuce leaf?!? Gorgeous! Behind it is the cover cloth fabric we pulled back to harvest it, that cloth keeps the bugs off of it and the leaves from getting chewed up.

I pulled that pepper plant and stripped off all the remaining peppers - some red, a few orange, but mainly still green. I stopped counting at 50! They are sweet, with just the barest touch of heat on some random peppers. I cored them and cut them up then froze them spread out on cookie sheets overnight before placing them in freezer bags. I use them by the handful on pizzas -- I suppose I could add them also to an omelette or to other dishes, but I just love peppers on pizza, so they are reserved for this.
   By the way, do you like the bag I use to collect the peppers in (see photo)? It is the one from my breakfast cereal. I really like how thick they are and collect them in a cabinet and grab a few whenever I go out to the garden to harvest a few things. (I used to use newspaper sleeves, but I find they tear so easily.) I give many of the cereal bags away with my excess produce that I share too. At least they get re-used once or twice.
   I am not the only one in my household who likes the thickness and texture of these bags. As Santino, the bigger of my two cats, is obsessed with chewing on them. I often catch him when I hear "crinkle, 
crinkle, crinkle" in another room and jump up to stop him. If you look closely at this photo, you may see teeth marks around the top of this bag as well.  

From the seeds I planted two weeks ago, the Arugula and two rows Watermelon Radish 'Mantanghong' are growing well.

The seedlings for the White Bunching Onions, Cilantro, and Moss Curly Parsley are barely discenerable - if there at all. I will give them another week.

The Snap Peas 'Sugar Magnolia' are still climbing up their trellis -- no flowers or pea pods yet - but they have the biggest leaves on a pea plant that I have ever seen, along with the thickest stalks - I am talking pencil thickness!

The Broccoli seedlings are doing fine -- getting taller, but no florets forming yet.

My goal this week is to plant the Garlic and maybe a row of Carrot seeds. If time, I will also pull all the Basil and finally get that big batch of pesto made for freezing.

What are you harvesting in your garden this week? 


About Fenton Friday: Every Friday during the growing season, I'll be giving you an update on my community garden plot at the Fenton Street Community Garden just across the street from my house in zone 7 Mid-Atlantic MD/DC border. I'm plot #16. It is a 10 ft x 20 ft space and this is our 8th year in the garden. (It opened in May 2011.) See past posts about our edible garden by putting "Fenton" into the Search box above.

Wednesday, October 21, 2020

Plant Profile: Wild Ageratum

Wild Ageratum or Blue Mistflower  (Conoclinium coelestinum or Eupatorium coelestinum) is an Eastern native plant. It is in the aster family and blooms from mid-summer through mid-autumn. It prefers full to part sun and is hardy to USDA Zones 5 to 10.

This plant has an annual look-a-like – the short bedding plant Ageratum (Ageratum houstonianum). It is also a close relative of Common Boneset (Eupatorium perfoliatum) and is known alternatively as Blue Boneset.

Wild Ageratum likes moist, fertile soils and can spread aggressively. It is easy to pull out the rhizomes though and if reseeding is a concern, remove the spent flower heads before they go to seed. 

It can grow to 2 to 3 feet tall. To prevent flopping and prolong the bloom period, taller plants may be cut back in summer.

Pollinators are fond of it and deer seldom trouble it.

Wild Ageratum is hard to find at the garden center, but you can try native plant sales or ask for a springtime division from a gardening friend.

Wild Ageratum - You Can Grow That!

 The video was produced by Washington Gardener Magazine.

Visuals by Nicole Noechel
Audio by Kathy Jentz

 

 If you enjoy this video, please give it a thumbs up and subscribe to our Youtube channel (thank you!)

Remember to TURN ON notifications to know when our new videos are out

 FIND Washington Gardener Magazine ONLINE

WashingtonGardener.blogspot.com

http://twitter.com/WDCGardener

https://www.instagram.com/wdcgardener/

~ Facebook.com/WashingtonGardenerMagazine

~ Podcast: GardenDC on Spotify, Apple, etc.

PIN THIS FOR LATER!


Monday, October 19, 2020

October 2020 issue of Washington Gardener Magazine – Tiger Eyes Sumac, Growing Hops, Trouble-Free Roses and much more

 

The October 2020 issue of Washington Gardener Magazine is out now.

Inside this issue:

·         Tiger Eyes Cutleaf Staghorn Sumac

·         Growing Hops at Home

·         Selecting Trouble-Free Roses

·         The Best Time to Plant Garlic

·         Meet Prince George’s Urban Agricultural Conservation Planner

·         Ready Your Yard for Fall

·         What to Do in the Garden this Month

·         Mastering Perfect Bulb–Perennial Combinations
and much more…

 

Note that any submissions, event listings, and advertisements for the November 2020 issue are due by November 5.

>>  Subscribe to Washington Gardener Magazine today to have the monthly publication sent to your inbox as a PDF several days before it is available online. You can use the PayPal (credit card) online order form here: http://www.washingtongardener.com/index_files/subscribe.htm


Help Us Stay Out of Spam Folders!

The following things will help Washington Gardener avoid your spam folder.

~ Add washingtongardenermagazine@gmail.com to your address/contact list.

~Mark as "not spam" or "never block sender" if found in your spam folder.

Saturday, October 17, 2020

GardenDC Podcast Episode 33: US Botanic Garden’s 200th Anniversary

This episode we talk with Saharah Moon Chapotin, Susan Pell, and Devin Dotson about the US Botanic Garden’s 200th Anniversary. The plant profile is on Mexican Feather Grass and I share what's blooming in my garden.


BTW, YOU can become a listener supporter for as little as $0.99 per month!
See how at: https://anchor.fm/kathy-jentz/support. 

The episode is posted at: https://anchor.fm/gardendc/episodes/October-17--2020---US-Botanic-Gardens-200th-Anniversary-el4p99

It is also available on -
  • Google Podcasts at this link, either now or soon (note that currently, this link will only work on Android devices)

We welcome your questions and comments! 
You can leave a voice mail message for us at: https://anchor.fm/kathy-jentz/message Note that we may use these messages on a future episode.

PIN THIS FOR LATER!


Friday, October 16, 2020

Fenton Friday: Radish Seedlings

Thinning Radish Seedlings
We are expecting a light frost this weekend at the community garden plot. I picked my last couple of small Cucumbers, a few Okra, and one small Eggplant. I should have stripped all the remaining Peppers and Tomatoes too -- along with pulling all the Basil -- but this week was a busy one giving talks and laying out the magazine -- I may get to that tomorrow.

From the seeds I planted last week, the Cilantro, Arugula, and two rows Watermelon Radish 'Mantanghong' are all up. The radish seedlings already need thinning, so that is basically the only task I got done, along with some minor weeding.

The seedlings for the White Bunching Onions and Moss Curly Parsley have not made an appearance yet. I'll give them another week or so, before calling them a bust.

The Snap Peas 'Sugar Magnolia'* are still climbing up their trellis -- no flowers or pea pods yet.

The Lettuce Leaf 'Salad Bowl Blend' is ready to cut and I am saving that for the interns visit early next week.

The Broccoli seedlings are doing fine -- getting taller, but no florets as of today.

Soon, it will also be time to plant Garlic. I may do that in the spot the tomatoes are in right now.

What are you harvesting in your garden this week? 


About Fenton Friday: Every Friday during the growing season, I'll be giving you an update on my community garden plot at the Fenton Street Community Garden just across the street from my house in zone 7 Mid-Atlantic MD/DC border. I'm plot #16. It is a 10 ft x 20 ft space and this is our 8th year in the garden. (It opened in May 2011.) See past posts about our edible garden by putting "Fenton" into the Search box above.

Thursday, October 15, 2020

Déjà Vu -- a Reblooming Bloom Day

Here in the Mid-Atlantic USA (USDA zone 7) on the DC-MD border, the past month has been a fairly typical early autumn. My garden is humming along. For this month's bloom day, I thought I'd share a few of the plants that I am trialing that are reblooming now. These are all bred to have flowers outside our usual bloom times.

I have a Bloomerang Dwarf Purple Lilac blooming now, along with several reblooming Weigela, Hydrangea, and Azalea varieties. Pictured below is an azalea I was recently sent to trial. It arrived several pruned back and took a few weeks to recover. It is now covered in flowers and looking quite spectacular.


Azalea Perfecto Mundo Double Pink from Proven Winners


What is blooming in your garden today?


It is the 15th of the month, which means Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day again. To view links to other garden bloggers' blooms around the world to see what it blooming in their gardens today and to read their collective comments, go to:

Wednesday, October 14, 2020

Plant Profile: Mexican Feather Grass (Nassella tenuissima)

Mexican Feather Grass is a versatile ornamental grass that has many uses in the home landscape. It can be used in groupings, as a specimen plant, for edging, and in containers.

 In spring, the grass is a lime green, then sends out blonde-colored seed heads in summer and finally, in fall, the plant turns a tawny golden color.

 This grass has lovely movement and drama in the garden. It can add a layer of texture that blends well with many other plants such as Tall Sedums, Brazilian Verbena, and Echinacea.

 It is hardy to zones 7 to 10. It can grow in situations from full sun to part shade with good drainage. It is drought- and heat-tolerant.

 Mexican Feather Grass is a relatively small grass. Its mature size is approximately two feet high and wide. It can be divided in the springtime and is a low-maintenance plant in our region. It can be an aggressive spreader in other areas like California.

 The Latin name for Mexican Feather Grass recently changed from Stipa to Nassella, which has caused a little bit of confusion and you will hear people call the grass by either name, but they are all the same plant.

Mexican Feather Grass - You Can Grow That!

The video was produced by Washington Gardener Magazine.

Visuals by Nicole Noechel
Audio by Kathy Jentz

 

 If you enjoy this video, please give it a thumbs up and subscribe to our Youtube channel (thank you!)

Remember to TURN ON notifications to know when our new videos are out

 FIND Washington Gardener Magazine ONLINE

WashingtonGardener.blogspot.com

http://twitter.com/WDCGardener

https://www.instagram.com/wdcgardener/

~ Facebook.com/WashingtonGardenerMagazine

~ Podcast: GardenDC on Spotify, Apple, etc.

PIN THIS FOR LATER!




Monday, October 12, 2020

SPRING PUBLICATION INTERNS SOUGHT

Washington Gardener Magazine, a 15-year-old local gardening magazine, is looking for talented SPRING interns. Candidates must display an eagerness to learn about the publishing industry.

The successful candidate will either be a junior or senior in college, who is interested in examining a career in magazine journalism. The unpaid program requires a 10-20-hour weekly commitment, with hours being flexible, including some weekend local garden events. The internship will begin in late January and run through the spring session. The student will be responsible for determining whether college credit will also be available for the internship program.

Duties would include: • Communicating with authors • Conducting interviews • Proofing & editing articles • Researching • Taking photographs/videos  • Press Releases, both writing and editing • Blogging, both writing and posting • Social Media Campaign • Assisting with mass mailers, and providing general support to our editorial staff. Ideal candidates will have a journalism background, but all students passionate about gaining experience with a local, vibrant digital magazine are encouraged to apply.

Students should send a cover letter, names of references, and copies of their best writing samples BY Monday, November 23 to:

Kathy Jentz
Editor/Publisher
Washington Gardener Magazine
826 Philadelphia Ave.
Silver Spring, MD 20910
kathyjentz (at) gmail.com


Photo source: Unsplash.com




Saturday, October 10, 2020

GardenDC Podcast Episode 32: Garden Tours, Private European Gardens, and Goldenrod

This episode we talk with Carolyn Mullet about her Garden Tours and upcoming book on private European gardens, Adventures in Eden. The plant profile is on Goldenrod and I share some observations about the Wild Ageratum blooming in my garden.


BTW, YOU can become a listener supporter for as little as $0.99 per month!
See how at: https://anchor.fm/kathy-jentz/support. 

The episode is posted at: https://anchor.fm/gardendc/episodes/October-10--2020---Garden-Tours--Private-European-Gardens--and-Goldenrod-eks7fg

It is also available on -
  • Google Podcasts at this link, either now or soon (note that currently, this link will only work on Android devices)

We welcome your questions and comments! 
You can leave a voice mail message for us at: https://anchor.fm/kathy-jentz/message Note that we may use these messages on a future episode.

PIN THIS FOR LATER!


Featured Post

Gifts for Gardeners ~ Gardening Gifts ~ Cool Gardening Gift Ideas

Today is Amazon Prime Day, so I thought I'd again share the garden products I use almost every day. These are the tried-and-true w...