Monday, August 08, 2022

Monday Thoughts: "Gardening adds years to your life and life to your years." - unknown

 

"Gardening adds years to your life and life to your years."

- unknown

Saturday, August 06, 2022

GardenDC Podcast Episode 114: The Art of Topiary

In this episode, we talk with Emily Emerick, Executive Director of Ladew Topiary Gardens, about the art of topiary The plant profile is on Nasturtium and we share what's going on in the garden as well as some upcoming local gardening events.


BTW, YOU can become a listener supporter for as little as $0.99 per month! See how at: https://anchor.fm/gardendc/support.

The SHOW NOTES will be posted here on 8/9.

If you liked this episode, you may also enjoy listening to:
GardenDC Podcast Episode 79: Boxwood
https://washingtongardener.blogspot.com/2021/10/gardendc-podcast-episode-79-boxwood.html
GardenDC Podcast Episode 38: Art in the Garden

This episode is archived online at: 
https://anchor.fm/gardendc/episodes/The-Art-of-Topiary-e1lsvgm

We welcome your questions and comments! You can leave a voice mail message for us at: https://anchor.fm/gardendc/message Note that we may use these messages on a future episode.

And be sure to leave us a 5-star review on your favorite platform so other gardeners can find us too!

Episode Credits:
Host and Producer: Kathy Jentz
Editing and Show Notes: Tori Vandergriff

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Friday, August 05, 2022

Fenton Friday: Starting Fresh

The renewed bed is at the top-right -- covered in fresh compost.

So I've been avoiding sharing with you all photos of the right side of my community plot. The left side is in pretty good shape and I've been keeping up weeding and chipping the middle aisle and surrounding pathways. But half of the right side had become an unruly mess. This was mostly due to the introduction of a few plants that are fast spreaders - yarrow, chives, and wild strawberry runners. NONE of these three were deliberately planted by me. They all came in from other plots or as "extras" in pots with things that I did plant. 

And when I say "fast spreader" I mean turn your back and they will take you out at the knees! To make matters worse, two invasive plants -- mulberry tree saplings and morning glory vines are also getting a foothold. I beat them back weekly, but all the good rain and mild weather that we've been having this year have made them much more prolific than ever. 

This past week, I took up an offer from a fellow member of the Silver Spring Timebank who was negative in his hours balance to help me weed out a section of the plot. In 1.5 hours, we tackled one discrete 3x6 bed and I finished it up with a layer of compost. In it, I planted dahlia tubers that had sprouted in storage and were far past needing to be in the ground. I also added a short trellis and planted a cucamelon vine at its base. 

Mid-summer is not the ideal time to do a total bed refresh, but like a lot of gardening (and life) you tackle things when you have the energy and availability rather than what is ideal for the plants themselves.

About Fenton Friday: Every Friday during the growing season, I'll be giving you an update on my community garden plot at the Fenton Street Community Garden just across the street from my house in zone 7 Mid-Atlantic MD/DC border. I'm plot #16. It is a 10 ft x 20 ft space and this is our 11th year in the garden. (It opened in May 2011.) See past posts about our edible garden by putting "Fenton" into the Search box above.

Wednesday, August 03, 2022

Nasturtium Plant Profile

Nasturtium Plant Profile

Nasturtium (Tropaeolum spp.) is an annual flower that is often grown in vegetable gardens as well as in mixed flower containers. There are trailing Nasturtiums that are vining types that will need trellises or supports and bush-type Nasturtium that grow in a more compact mound. They are native to Central and South America.

Depending on the variety you choose, the flowers either bloom in bright, fiery tones or muted peaches and butter yellows. The leaves are round and usually deep green.

Nasturtium can act as a trap crop in your edible garden drawing away aphids from other vulnerable plants. They are also attractive to pollinators and are visited by bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds.

Nasturtiums are easy to grow from seed. Just soak the seeds overnight and then direct-sow them in the ground or a container after the last spring frost has passed. They like growing in “lean” soils and do not need any fertilizers. The soil should be well-draining and the location must be in full sun for best flower production.

The only care they need is regular watering, but not too much water as they don’t like overly moist soils.

Nasturtiums are edible! The leaves and flowers have a peppery, sharp taste. They are often used as a colorful garnish in salads.

The large seedpods can also be pickled and used like capers. To do this, harvest the seedpods before they harden. Once they harden, you can collect the seeds to plant next year.

Nasturtium: You Can Grow That!

 

The video was produced by Washington Gardener Magazine as part of our Plant Profile series for Mid-Atlantic USA gardeners.

Audio and text by Kathy Jentz

Video and editing by Jamie Oberg

 

 If you enjoy this video, please give it a thumbs up and subscribe to our Youtube channel (thank you!)

Remember to TURN ON notifications to know when our new videos are out

 FIND Washington Gardener Magazine ONLINE

WashingtonGardener.blogspot.com

http://twitter.com/WDCGardener

https://www.instagram.com/wdcgardener/

~ Facebook.com/WashingtonGardenerMagazine

~ Podcast: GardenDC

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Monday, August 01, 2022

Monday Thoughts: Now the gardener is the one who has seen everything ruined so many times that, even as his pain increases with each loss, he comprehends, truly knows, that where there was a garden once there can be again.”

"Now the gardener is the one who has seen everything ruined so many times that, even as his pain increases with each loss, he comprehends, truly knows, that where there was a garden once there can be again.”

~ Henry Mitchell

Saturday, July 30, 2022

GardenDC Podcast Episode 113: Gardening with Children

In this episode, we talk with Sonya Harris, garden educator and advocate, about gardening with children. The plant profile is on Anise Hyssop and we share what's going on in the garden as well as some upcoming local gardening events.



BTW, YOU can become a listener supporter for as little as $0.99 per month! See how at: https://anchor.fm/gardendc/support.

The SHOW NOTES will be posted here on 8/9.

If you liked this episode, you may also enjoy listening to:

This episode is archived online at: 

We welcome your questions and comments! You can leave a voice mail message for us at: https://anchor.fm/gardendc/message Note that we may use these messages on a future episode.

And be sure to leave us a 5-star review on your favorite platform so other gardeners can find us too!

Episode Credits:
Host and Producer: Kathy Jentz
Editing and Show Notes: Tori Vandergriff

PIN THIS FOR LATER!

Friday, July 29, 2022

Fenton Friday: Dipping into a New Tomato

It has been another hot and humid week, but we had a couple decent rains. The tomato plants are starting to produce heavily now, though they are mainly still green.

The star tomato so far is the 'Sun Dipper'. It is a new variety for 2023 by PanAmerican SeedSun Dipper is described as: "an orange 'dipper' tomato with elongated fruit that is easily held between your fingers for dipping in dressing on a vegetable platter. This unique fruit shape is eye-catching and delicious." Shown at right is a set of fruits starting to ripen on our plant. I'd say right now there are roughly 20 more in various stages of growth on the same plant. I picked and ate one. It was delicious. I'm a big fan of dips and sauces, but I actually don't think this tomato needs any garnish or addition.

What varieties of tomato are you growing this year in your edible garden?

About Fenton Friday: Every Friday during the growing season, I'll be giving you an update on my community garden plot at the Fenton Street Community Garden just across the street from my house in zone 7 Mid-Atlantic MD/DC border. I'm plot #16. It is a 10 ft x 20 ft space and this is our 11th year in the garden. (It opened in May 2011.) See past posts about our edible garden by putting "Fenton" into the Search box above.

Wednesday, July 27, 2022

Anise Hyssop Plant Profile

Anise Hyssop Plant Profile

Anise Hyssop (Agastache foeniculum) is a perennial plant that is native to most of North America. It is hardy to USDA zones 3 to 8.

It is not a long-lived plant, but it makes up for that by self-sowing itself about. I often find volunteer plants coming up in the cracks of my driveway. You can deadhead it to encourage reblooming and prevent prolific reseeding.

Anise Hyssop prefers full to part sun and is drought resistant once established. It can rot if planted in overly moist soils. It is deer- and rabbit- resistant as well.

It is a great pollinator garden addition. The flower spikes can range from almost white to deep blue. It is visited by bees, butterflies, beetles, and hummingbirds. Goldfinches and other birds enjoy eating the dried seeds.

Anise Hyssop is a member of the mint family and is not a true “hyssop” – despite its common name. When you crush the leaves, a mild licorice scent is released. It has herbal and culinary uses, most notably as a tea. It can also be used to flavor fruit salads and jellies.

Popular cultivars include ‘Golden Jubilee’, which has chartreuse foliage, and ‘Blue Fortune’, which is a sterile hybrid with the Korean hyssop (A. rugosa).

Anise Hyssop: You Can Grow That!

The video was produced by Washington Gardener Magazine as part of our Plant Profile series for Mid-Atlantic USA gardeners.

Audio and text by Kathy Jentz

Video and editing by Jamie Oberg

 

 If you enjoy this video, please give it a thumbs up and subscribe to our Youtube channel (thank you!)

Remember to TURN ON notifications to know when our new videos are out

 FIND Washington Gardener Magazine ONLINE

WashingtonGardener.blogspot.com

http://twitter.com/WDCGardener

https://www.instagram.com/wdcgardener/

~ Facebook.com/WashingtonGardenerMagazine

~ Podcast: GardenDC

 PIN THIS FOR LATER!

Sunday, July 24, 2022

Win a pair of Long Straight Snip from Corona Tools in the July 2022 Washington Gardener Reader Contest

For our July 2022 Washington Gardener Reader Contest, we are giving away a pair of Long Straight Snip from Corona Tools. The prize value is $14.

   The Long Straight Snip has a long, straight, pointed blade for a wide range of applications. Corrosion-resistant stainless steel blades and pivot to prevent rusting, are easier to clean, and reduce germ build-up. It also has an unobtrusive leather strap lock.

   An authentic American brand, Corona Tools were born in the orange groves of California in the 1920s. Since then, generations of agriculturists, gardeners, landscapers, arborists, and construction professionals have turned to Corona to find high-quality tools that work as hard as they do. They know that Corona’s iconic red handles are an immediate symbol of quality and long-lasting durability. Learn more about Corona Tools at http://coronatoolsusa.com/.

   To enter to win a pair of Corona snips, send an email by 5:00pm on July 30 to WashingtonGardenerMagazine@gmail.com with “Corona Snips” in the Subject line and in the body of the email. Tell us what your favorite article was in the July 2022 issue and why. Please include your full name and mailing address. Winners will be announced and notified on/about August 1. 

UPDATE:

Congratulations to Sonia Hudson of Silver Spring, MD!
She won a pair of Long Straight Snip from Corona Tools in the July 2022 Washington Gardener Reader Contest.

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