Plant Profile: Daffodils


Deer-resistant, sweet smelling, tough, and long-lasting, Daffodils are a wonderful spring-blooming bulb to add to your garden.
   Plant them each fall at a depth of about two-times the bulb’s size. Then forget all about them until the foliage and flowers emerge the following spring.
   You can get varieties that bloom in early-season (February), mid-season (March) and late-season (April). Be sure to check the bulb bag labels and catalog descriptions, so you can have flowers all throughout spring.
   The only maintenance they ever need is to dig and divide them every 10 years or so, if they get too crowded and their flowering slows down.
    Shown here are some of my favorite varieties. The ‘Tete-a-Tete’ is a dwarf daffodil that has multiple blooms on a single stem. They are only 6-inches high and are terrific grouped on a slope or alongside a pathway.
   The ‘February Gold’ is a classic yellow daffodil that is the first to bloom in my garden. I love to cut it and enjoy it inside. One warning, if you bring them in as a cut-flower, do not mix them with other flowers, as they exude a toxin into the vase water that causes the other blooms to droop.
   Another favorite is ‘Ice Follies’, It is a classic bi-colored daffodil with large flower cups. It ranks third in the Top Ten Daffodils produced worldwide. 
   Including hybrids, there are over 13,000 distinct daffodil varieties in existence. You are sure to find a few favorites of your own.

The video was produced by Washington Gardener Magazine and edited by intern Allison O'Reilly.

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